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Mentorship Journey

Getting Started

  • Get to know your mentee by sharing information (e.g. academic background, research interests, hobbies, etc.).
  • Complete a Mentoring Agreement to define expectations and goals upfront.
  • Consider logistics such as:
    • Meeting time.
    • Frequency of meetings.
    • Duration of meeting.
    • Preferred method of communication.
  • When setting goals:
    • Understand areas where the mentee wants to grow,
    • Assess mentee's situation, attributes, skills and knowledge,
  • Help your mentee to define goals to undertake for success,
    • Write down goals to provide clear and objective standards,
    • Think about setting specific goals for yourself as a mentor.
  • Ask yourself,
    • How I can help the mentee to achieve his/her goals?
    • What are some of the tangible things that I can do?
    • What do I want to be known for as a mentor?
  • Create a Statement of Confidentiality to explicitly define what can and cannot be shared outside of the mentoring relationship.
  • Use a First Meeting Checklist to make sure you cover all logistics, expectations and goals needed for a successful mentorship.

Growing the Relationship

Growing the Relationship is the longest phase of the mentorship. Mentor and mentee should meet regularly, review and adjust goals, and monitor progress. You should address any problems (e.g., communication ) in the relationship at this point.

Evaluating the Relationship

Have a written evaluation to clearly understand how you can improve as a mentor.

Moving forward

Although the mentorship relationship might be officially ending, mentor and mentee are encouraged to continue to collaborate on research, engage in an unofficial mentorship, or become friends and colleagues.

Some practical actions you could take are:

  1. Engage in a collaborative relationship with your formal mentee, such as working together on a research proposal or project, or professional networking.
  2. Meet periodically to catch up and celebrate each other's success.

Evaluating the Relationship's Success

Have a written evaluation to clearly assess your progress and continue to work on your goals or redefine or adapt your strategies if they're not working

Moving Forward

Although the mentorship relationship might be ended officially, mentor and mentee are encouraged to continue to collaborate on research, engage in an informal mentoring relationship, or become friends and colleagues.

Here are few steps you could take after the mentoring relationship is officially over:

  1. Reflect on your growth, and determine if you should engage in any subsequent follow-up on developmental activities after the mentorship officially ends.
  2. Engage in a collaborative relationship with your formal mentor, such as working together on a research proposal or project, or professional networking.
  3. Meet periodically to catch up and celebrate each other's success.
  4. Finally, consider becoming a mentor!