Health Services Research & Development

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2006 HSR&D National Meeting Abstract


1059 — Prostate Cancer in Hispanics: An Emerging Focus of Patient Concern?

Author List:
Chang CH (Buehler Center on Aging, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University)
Hyland S (Buehler Center on Aging, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University)
Zagory JA (Midwest Center for Health Services and Policy Research; Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine)
Bennett CL (Midwest Center for Health Services and Policy Research; Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine)

Objectives:
According to ACS Cancer Statistics 2005, prostate cancer is the most prevalent type of cancer in men (33%). As men age, both benign and malignant conditions become more prevalent and an increase the Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels in the blood is often observed. The PSA test result can assist physicians to examine the possibility of prostate cancer. We aimed to evaluate the perceived risk and knowledge of prostate cancer across three race/ethnicity groups.

Methods:
Data were obtained from a national probability sample, the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS). HINTS is an NCI-sponsored general adult population survey conducted using computer-assisted telephone interviews. For the purpose of this study, we limited respondents to males who were at least 35 years old and had not had prostate cancer.

Results:
A total of 1,414 males were included: 11% Hispanic, 78% non-Hispanic White, and 11% non-Hispanic Black or African American. Among Hispanics, 20% reported “somewhat high” and “very high” likelihood to get prostate cancer as opposed to 13.1% in Whites and 14.6% in Blacks; 17% of Hispanics reported more likelihood to get prostate cancer when comparing themselves to average men, whereas Whites (9.2%) and Blacks (15.2%) reported lower likelihood. More Hispanics (14%) reported worrying “all the time” or “often” of getting prostate cancer (4% White; 8% Black). More Hispanics than Whites and Blacks had not heard of a PSA test (63%, 35%, and 41%, respectively). Among those who had heard of a PSA test, 57% of Hispanics had never been advised to be tested (48% in Whites and 40% in Blacks).

Implications:
We found that Hispanics perceived higher risk of and worried more about getting prostate cancer. However, they were less likely to know about the PSA test or be advised of getting a PSA test. It is apparent there exist health disparities in the perceived risk, screening knowledge, and behaviors of prostate cancer across the three different race/ethnicity groups, meriting further investigation to identify potential causes and barriers so that proper educational and interventional programs can be specifically tailored.

Impacts:
Whereas focus has previously been on African American prostate cancer patients, it is important to investigate inequalities in other minority populations, such as Hispanics.