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Older adults' coping with negative life events: common processes of managing health, interpersonal, and financial/work stressors.

Moos RH, Brennan PL, Schutte KK, Moos BS. Older adults' coping with negative life events: common processes of managing health, interpersonal, and financial/work stressors. International journal of aging & human development. 2006 Jan 1; 62(1):39-59.

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Abstract:

This study examined how older adults cope with negative life events in health, interpersonal, and financial/work domains and whether common stress and coping processes hold across these three domains. On three occasions, older adults identified the most severe negative event they faced in the last year and described how they appraised and coped with that event, their ambient chronic stressors, and event and functioning outcomes. The stress and coping process was largely consistent across the three life domains. Individuals who appraised events as challenging and relied more on approach coping were more likely to report some benefit from those events. Individuals who experienced more chronic stressors and favored avoidance coping were more likely to be depressed and to have late-life drinking problems. Chronic stressors, as well as approach and avoidance coping, were predictably associated with overall outcomes in all three event domains. These findings provide a basis for preventive interventions that may help older adults' address the most prevalent stressors of aging more effectively.





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