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Adapting a computer-delivered brief alcohol intervention for veterans with Hepatitis C.

Cucciare MA, Jamison AL, Combs AS, Joshi G, Cheung RC, Rongey C, Huggins J, Humphreys K. Adapting a computer-delivered brief alcohol intervention for veterans with Hepatitis C. Informatics for health & social care. 2017 Dec 1; 42(4):378-392.

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Abstract:

OBJECTIVE: This study adapted an existing computer-delivered brief alcohol intervention (cBAI) for use in Veterans with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) and examined its acceptability and feasibility in this patient population. METHODS: A four-stage model consisting of initial pilot testing, qualitative interviews with key stakeholders, development of a beta version of the cBAI, and usability testing was used to achieve the study objectives. RESULTS: In-depth interviews gathered feedback for modifying the cBAI, including adding HCV-related content such as the health effects of alcohol on liver functioning, immune system functioning, and management of HCV, a preference for concepts to be displayed through "newer looking" graphics, and limiting the use of text to convey key concepts. Results from usability testing indicated that the modified cBAI was acceptable and feasible for use in this patient population. CONCLUSIONS: The development model used in this study is effective for gathering actionable feedback that can inform the development of a cBAI and can result in the development of an acceptable and feasible intervention for use in this population. Findings also have implications for developing computer-delivered interventions targeting behavior change more broadly.





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