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The Patient Safety Indicator Perioperative Pulmonary Embolism or Deep Vein Thrombosis: Is there associated surveillance bias in the Veterans Health Administration?

Borzecki AM, Chen Q, O'Brien W, Shwartz M, Najjar PA, Itani KMF, Rosen AK. The Patient Safety Indicator Perioperative Pulmonary Embolism or Deep Vein Thrombosis: Is there associated surveillance bias in the Veterans Health Administration? American journal of surgery. 2018 Nov 1; 216(5):974-979.

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Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Studies disagree whether surveillance bias is associated with perioperative venous thromboembolism (VTE) performance measures. A prior VA study used a chart-based outcome; no studies have used the fully specified administrative data-based AHRQ Patient Safety Indicator, PSI-12, as their primary outcome. If surveillance bias were present, we hypothesized that inpatient surveillance rates would be associated with higher PSI-12 rates, but with lower post-discharge VTE rates. METHODS: Using VA data, we examined Pearson correlations between hospital-level VTE imaging rates and risk-adjusted PSI-12 rates and post-discharge VTE rates. To determine the robustness of findings, we conducted several sensitivity analyses. RESULTS: Hospital imaging rates were positively correlated with both PSI-12 (r = 0.24, p = 0.01) and post-discharge VTE rates (r = 0.16, p = 0.09). Sensitivity analyses yielded similar findings. CONCLUSIONS: Like the prior VA study, we found no evidence of PSI-12-related surveillance bias. Given the use of PSI-12 in nationwide measurement, these findings warrant replication using similar methods in the non-VA setting.





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