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Patients' Positive and Negative Responses to Reading Mental Health Clinical Notes Online.

Denneson LM, Chen JI, Pisciotta M, Tuepker A, Dobscha SK. Patients' Positive and Negative Responses to Reading Mental Health Clinical Notes Online. Psychiatric services (Washington, D.C.). 2018 May 1; 69(5):593-596.

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Abstract:

OBJECTIVE: This study describes responses to OpenNotes, clinical notes available online, among patients receiving mental health care and explores whether responses vary by patient demographic or clinical characteristics. METHODS: Survey data from 178 veterans receiving mental health treatment at a large Veterans Affairs medical center included patient-reported health self-efficacy, health knowledge, alliance with clinicians, and negative emotional responses after reading OpenNotes. Health care data were extracted from the patient care database. RESULTS: Reading OpenNotes helped many participants feel in control of their health care (49%) and have more trust in clinicians (45%), although a few (8%) frequently felt upset after reading their notes. In multivariate models, posttraumatic stress disorder was associated with increased patient-clinician alliance (p = .046) but also with negative emotional responses (p < .01). CONCLUSIONS: Patients receiving mental health care frequently reported benefits from reading OpenNotes, yet some experienced negative responses.





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