Talk to the Veterans Crisis Line now
U.S. flag
An official website of the United States government

Health Services Research & Development

Go to the ORD website
Go to the QUERI website

HSR&D Citation Abstract

Search | Search by Center | Search by Source | Keywords in Title

The association between perceived distress tolerance and cannabis use problems, cannabis withdrawal symptoms, and self-efficacy for quitting cannabis: The explanatory role of pain-related affective distress.

Manning K, Rogers AH, Bakhshaie J, Hogan JBD, Buckner JD, Ditre JW, Zvolensky MJ. The association between perceived distress tolerance and cannabis use problems, cannabis withdrawal symptoms, and self-efficacy for quitting cannabis: The explanatory role of pain-related affective distress. Addictive Behaviors. 2018 Oct 1; 85:1-7.

Dimensions for VA is a web-based tool available to VA staff that enables detailed searches of published research and research projects.

If you have VA-Intranet access, click here for more information vaww.hsrd.research.va.gov/dimensions/

VA staff not currently on the VA network can access Dimensions by registering for an account using their VA email address.
   Search Dimensions for VA for this citation
* Don't have VA-internal network access or a VA email address? Try searching the free-to-the-public version of Dimensions



Abstract:

Rates of cannabis use and related problems continue to rise, ranking as the third most common substance use disorder in the United States, behind tobacco and alcohol use. Past work suggests that perceived distress tolerance is related to several clinically significant features of cannabis use (e.g., coping-oriented use). However, there has been little exploration of the mechanisms that may underlie relations between perceived distress tolerance and cannabis use problems, withdrawal severity, and self-efficacy for quitting. The current study sought to examine the experience of pain, which frequently co-occurs with cannabis use (Ashrafioun, Bohnert, Jannausch, and Ilgen, 2015), as an underlying factor in the relation between perceived distress tolerance and cannabis related problems among 203 current cannabis-using adults (29.2% female, M = 37.7 years, SD = 10.2, 63% African American). Results indicated that perceived distress tolerance via pain related affective distress significantly predicted the severity of cannabis use problems (Pm = 0.60), degree of cannabis withdrawal (Pm = 0.39), and lower self-efficacy for quitting cannabis (Pm = 0.36). Future work may usefully explore the role of pain-related affective distress as a mechanistic factor in the context of perceived distress tolerance-cannabis relations.





Questions about the HSR&D website? Email the Web Team.

Any health information on this website is strictly for informational purposes and is not intended as medical advice. It should not be used to diagnose or treat any condition.