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Experiences with interferon-free hepatitis C therapies: addressing barriers to adherence and optimizing treatment outcomes.

Skolnik AA, Noska A, Yakovchenko V, Tsai J, Jones N, Gifford AL, McInnes DK. Experiences with interferon-free hepatitis C therapies: addressing barriers to adherence and optimizing treatment outcomes. BMC health services research. 2019 Feb 1; 19(1):91.

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Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Millions of Americans are living with hepatitis C, the leading cause of liver disease in the United States. Medication treatment can cure hepatitis C. We sought to understand factors that contribute to hepatitis C treatment completion from the perspectives of patients and providers. METHODS: We conducted semi-structured interviews at three Veterans Affairs Medical Centers. Patients were asked about their experiences with hepatitis C treatments and perspectives on care. Providers were asked about observations regarding patient responses to medications and perspectives about factors resulting in treatment completion. Transcripts were analyzed using a grounded thematic approach-an inductive analysis that lets themes emerge from the data. RESULTS: Contributors to treatment completion included Experience with Older Treatments, Hope for Improvement, Symptom Relief, Tailored Organized Routines, and Positive Patient-Provider Relationship. Corresponding barriers also emerged, including pill burden and skepticism about treatment effectiveness and safety. CONCLUSION: Despite the improved side-effect profile of newer HCV medications, multiple barriers to treatment completion remain. However, providers and patients were able to identify avenues for addressing such barriers.





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