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Changes in Perceived Stress After Yoga, Physical Therapy, and Education Interventions for Chronic Low Back Pain: A Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

Berlowitz J, Hall DL, Joyce C, Fredman L, Sherman KJ, Saper RB, Roseen EJ. Changes in Perceived Stress After Yoga, Physical Therapy, and Education Interventions for Chronic Low Back Pain: A Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Controlled Trial. Pain medicine (Malden, Mass.). 2020 Oct 1; 21(10):2529-2537.

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Abstract:

OBJECTIVE: Perceived stress and musculoskeletal pain are common, especially in low-income populations. Studies evaluating treatments to reduce stress in patients with chronic pain are lacking. We aimed to quantify the effect of two evidence-based interventions for chronic low back pain (cLBP), yoga and physical therapy (PT), on perceived stress in adults with cLBP. METHODS: We used data from an assessor-blinded, parallel-group randomized controlled trial, which recruited predominantly low-income and racially diverse adults with cLBP. Participants (N? = 320) were randomly assigned to 12?weeks of yoga, PT, or back pain education. We compared changes in the 10-item Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10) from baseline to 12- and 52-week follow-up among yoga and PT participants with those receiving education. Subanalyses were conducted for participants with elevated pre-intervention perceived stress (PSS-10 score = 17). We conducted sensitivity analyses using various imputation methods to account for potential biases in our estimates due to missing data. RESULTS: Among 248 participants (mean age = 46.4 years, 80% nonwhite) completing all three surveys, yoga and PT showed greater reductions in PSS-10 scores compared with education at 12?weeks (mean between-group difference = -2.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] = -4.5 to -0.66, and mean between-group difference = -2.4, 95% CI = -4.4 to -0.48, respectively). This effect was stronger among participants with elevated pre-intervention perceived stress. Between-group effects had attenuated by 52?weeks. Results were similar in sensitivity analyses. CONCLUSIONS: Yoga and PT were more effective than back pain education for reducing perceived stress among low-income adults with cLBP.





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