Talk to the Veterans Crisis Line now
U.S. flag
An official website of the United States government

Health Services Research & Development

Go to the ORD website
Go to the QUERI website

HSR&D Citation Abstract

Search | Search by Center | Search by Source | Keywords in Title

Changes in Health Care Access and Utilization for Low-SES Adults Aged 51-64 Years After Medicaid Expansion.

Tipirneni R, Levy HG, Langa KM, McCammon RJ, Zivin K, Luster J, Karmakar M, Ayanian JZ. Changes in Health Care Access and Utilization for Low-SES Adults Aged 51-64 Years After Medicaid Expansion. The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences. 2021 Jun 14; 76(6):1218-1230.

Dimensions for VA is a web-based tool available to VA staff that enables detailed searches of published research and research projects.

If you have VA-Intranet access, click here for more information vaww.hsrd.research.va.gov/dimensions/

VA staff not currently on the VA network can access Dimensions by registering for an account using their VA email address.
   Search Dimensions for VA for this citation
* Don't have VA-internal network access or a VA email address? Try searching the free-to-the-public version of Dimensions



Abstract:

OBJECTIVES: Whether the Affordable Care Act (ACA) insurance expansions improved access to care and health for adults aged 51-64 years has not been closely examined. This study examined longitudinal changes in access, utilization, and health for low-socioeconomic status adults aged 51-64 years before and after the ACA Medicaid expansion. METHODS: Longitudinal difference-in-differences (DID) study before (2010-2014) and after (2016) Medicaid expansion, including N = 2,088 noninstitutionalized low-education adults aged 51-64 years (n = 633 in Medicaid expansion states, n = 1,455 in nonexpansion states) from the nationally representative biennial Health and Retirement Study. Outcomes included coverage (any, Medicaid, and private), access (usual source of care, difficulty finding a physician, foregone care, cost-related medication nonadherence, and out-of-pocket costs), utilization (outpatient visit and hospitalization), and health status. RESULTS: Low-education adults aged 51-64 years had increased rates of Medicaid coverage (+10.6 percentage points [pp] in expansion states, +3.2 pp in nonexpansion states, DID +7.4 pp, p = .001) and increased likelihood of hospitalizations (+9.2 pp in expansion states, -1.1 pp in nonexpansion states, DID +10.4 pp, p = .003) in Medicaid expansion compared with nonexpansion states after 2014. Those in expansion states also had a smaller increase in limitations in paid work/housework over time, compared to those in nonexpansion states (+3.6 pp in expansion states, +11.0 pp in nonexpansion states, DID -7.5 pp, p = .006). There were no other significant differences in access, utilization, or health trends between expansion and nonexpansion states. DISCUSSION: After Medicaid expansion, low-education status adults aged 51-64 years were more likely to be hospitalized, suggesting poor baseline access to chronic disease management and pent-up demand for hospital services.





Questions about the HSR&D website? Email the Web Team.

Any health information on this website is strictly for informational purposes and is not intended as medical advice. It should not be used to diagnose or treat any condition.