Talk to the Veterans Crisis Line now
U.S. flag
An official website of the United States government

Health Services Research & Development

Go to the ORD website
Go to the QUERI website

HSR&D Citation Abstract

Search | Search by Center | Search by Source | Keywords in Title

Testing, referral, and treatment patterns for hepatitis C virus coinfection in a cohort of veterans with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

Fultz SL, Justice AC, Butt AA, Rabeneck L, Weissman S, Rodriguez-Barradas M. Testing, referral, and treatment patterns for hepatitis C virus coinfection in a cohort of veterans with human immunodeficiency virus infection. Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. 2003 Apr 15; 36(8):1039-46.

Dimensions for VA is a web-based tool available to VA staff that enables detailed searches of published research and research projects.

If you have VA-Intranet access, click here for more information vaww.hsrd.research.va.gov/dimensions/

VA staff not currently on the VA network can access Dimensions by registering for an account using their VA email address.
   Search Dimensions for VA for this citation
Abstract:

We examined testing, referral, and treatment of patients with hepatitis C among HIV-infected patients in the Veterans Aging 3-Site Cohort Study by using patient- and provider-completed surveys and laboratory, pharmacy, and administrative records from the Department of Veterans Affairs electronic medical record. Of 881 human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients, 43% were coinfected with hepatitis C virus. Of these, 88 (30%) reported current alcohol consumption. Only one-third were counseled to reduce or stop alcohol consumption. Coinfected patients with indications for hepatitis C treatment had a high rate of contraindications, including both medical and psychiatric comorbidities. Of the 65 patients with indications for hepatitis C therapy and free of contraindications for treatment, only 18% underwent liver biopsy and 3% received IFN. Although treatment indications are common in this population, contraindications are also common. Health care providers are often unaware of alcohol consumption that may accelerate the course of hepatitis C, increase the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma, and reduce treatment efficacy.





Questions about the HSR&D website? Email the Web Team.

Any health information on this website is strictly for informational purposes and is not intended as medical advice. It should not be used to diagnose or treat any condition.