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Hepatitis C infection and risk of diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

White DL, Ratziu V, El-Serag HB. Hepatitis C infection and risk of diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Journal of Hepatology. 2008 Nov 1; 49(5):831-44.

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Abstract:

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Several studies found hepatitis C (HCV) increases risk of Type II diabetes mellitus (DM). However, others found no or only sub-group specific excess risk. We performed meta-analyses to examine whether HCV infection does increase DM risk in comparison to the general population and in other sub-groups with increased liver disease rates including with hepatitis B (HBV). METHODS: We followed standard guidelines for performance of meta-analyses. Two independent investigators identified eligible studies through structured keyword searches in relevant databases including PubMed. RESULTS: We identified 34 eligible studies. Pooled estimators indicated significant DM risk in HCV-infected cases in comparison to non-infected controls in both retrospective (OR(adjusted) = 1.68, 95% CI 1.15-2.20) and prospective studies (HR(adjusted) = 1.67, 95% CI 1.28-2.06). Excess risk was also observed in comparison to HBV-infected controls (OR(adjusted) = 1.80, 95% CI 1.20-1.40) with suggestive excess observed in HCV+/HIV+ cases in comparison to HIV+ controls (OR(unadjusted) = 1.82, 95% CI 1.27-2.38). CONCLUSIONS: Our finding of excess DM risk with HCV infection in comparison to non-infected controls is strengthened by consistency of results from both prospective and retrospective studies. The excess risk observed in comparison to HBV-infected controls suggests a potential direct viral role in promoting DM risk, but this needs to be further examined.





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