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Job satisfaction and burnout among VA and community mental health workers.

Salyers MP, Rollins AL, Kelly YF, Lysaker PH, Williams JR. Job satisfaction and burnout among VA and community mental health workers. Administration and policy in mental health. 2013 Mar 1; 40(2):69-75.

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Abstract:

Building on two independent studies, we compared burnout and job satisfaction of 66 VA staff and 86 community mental health center staff in the same city. VA staff reported significantly greater job satisfaction and accomplishment, less emotional exhaustion and lower likelihood of leaving their job. Sources of work satisfaction were similar (primarily working with clients, helping/witnessing change). VA staff reported fewer challenges with job-related aspects (e.g. flexibility, pay) but more challenges with administration. Community mental health administrators and policymakers may need to address job-related concerns (e.g. pay) whereas VA administrators may focus on reducing, and helping workers navigate, administrative policies.





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