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Impact of donor and recipient race on survival after hepatitis C-related liver transplantation.

Layden JE, Cotler SJ, Grim SA, Fischer MJ, Lucey MR, Clark NM. Impact of donor and recipient race on survival after hepatitis C-related liver transplantation. Transplantation. 2012 Feb 27; 93(4):444-9.

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Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Both donor and recipient race impact outcomes after liver transplantation (LT), especially for hepatitis C virus (HCV). The interaction and simultaneous impact of both on patient survival is not clearly defined. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of donor and recipient race on recipient and graft survival after HCV-related LT using the United Network for Organ Sharing database. METHODS: A total of 16,053 recipients (75.5% white, 9.3% black, and 15.2% Hispanic) who underwent primary LT for HCV between 1998 and 2008 were included. Cox regression models were used to assess the association between recipient/donor race and patient survival. RESULTS: A significant interaction between donor and recipient race was noted (P = 0.01). Black recipients with white donors had a higher risk of patient mortality (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.66; 95% confidence interval, 1.47-1.87) compared with that of white recipients with white donors. In contrast, the pairing of Hispanic recipients with black donors was associated with a lower risk of recipient mortality compared with that of white recipients with white donors (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.64; 95% confidence interval, 0.46-0.87). Similar results were noted for graft failure. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, the impact of donor and recipient race on patient survival varies substantially by the matching of recipient/donor race.





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