Talk to the Veterans Crisis Line now
U.S. flag
An official website of the United States government

Health Services Research & Development

Go to the ORD website
Go to the QUERI website

HSR&D Citation Abstract

Search | Search by Center | Search by Source | Keywords in Title

Association of gender with morbidity and mortality after isolated coronary artery bypass grafting. A propensity score matched analysis.

Alam M, Lee VV, Elayda MA, Shahzad SA, Yang EY, Nambi V, Jneid H, Pan W, Coulter S, Wilson JM, Ramanathan KB, Ballantyne CM, Virani SS. Association of gender with morbidity and mortality after isolated coronary artery bypass grafting. A propensity score matched analysis. International Journal of Cardiology. 2013 Jul 15; 167(1):180-4.

Dimensions for VA is a web-based tool available to VA staff that enables detailed searches of published research and research projects.

If you have VA-Intranet access, click here for more information vaww.hsrd.research.va.gov/dimensions/

VA staff not currently on the VA network can access Dimensions by registering for an account using their VA email address.
   Search Dimensions for VA for this citation
* Don't have VA-internal network access or a VA email address? Try searching the free-to-the-public version of Dimensions



Abstract:

INTRODUCTION: There is conflicting evidence about the impact of gender on outcomes after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). METHODS: We performed a multivariate logistic regression and propensity score matched analyses in 13,115 patients (75% men) who underwent CABG between January 1, 1995 and December 31, 2009. The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes included post-operative respiratory failure, stroke, myocardial infarction, sternal and leg wound infections, atrial fibrillation (AF), renal failure, need for postoperative intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) support, and length of hospital stay. RESULTS: A higher proportion of women (184; 5.6%) suffered in-hospital death compared to men (264; 2.7%), p < 0.0001. After propensity score matching (n = 3600 total, 1800 in each group), female gender was an independent predictor of mortality after isolated CABG (odds ratio [OR] = 1.84; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.22-2.78). Women also experienced a higher incidence of postoperative complications including stroke (3.8% vs. 2.3%, OR 1.37; 95% CI 1.08-1.73) and leg wound infection (3.4% vs. 1.7%, OR 1.75; 95% CI 1.36-2.54) on multivariate regression analyses. However, these differences were not significant after propensity score matching. We also observed a lower risk of post-operative AF (21.2% vs. 22.1%, OR 0.78; 95% CI 0.70-0.86) in women that remained significant after propensity matching (O.R. 0.76; 95% C.I. 0.65-0.90). Length of hospital stay was longer in women compared with men (11.9 ± 9.0 vs. 10.4 ± 9.2 days, p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Female gender is an independent predictor of increased mortality and a lower incidence of post-operative AF after isolated CABG.





Questions about the HSR&D website? Email the Web Team.

Any health information on this website is strictly for informational purposes and is not intended as medical advice. It should not be used to diagnose or treat any condition.