Talk to the Veterans Crisis Line now
U.S. flag
An official website of the United States government

Health Services Research & Development

Go to the ORD website
Go to the QUERI website

HSR&D Citation Abstract

Search | Search by Center | Search by Source | Keywords in Title

REM Sleep Bout Duration and Frequency in PTSD

Ulmer CS, Sutherland M, Edinger JD, Davidson J, Connor KM, Zhang W, Krystal A. REM Sleep Bout Duration and Frequency in PTSD. Journal of aggression, maltreatment & trauma. 2012 Jan 18; 21(1):67-76.

Dimensions for VA is a web-based tool available to VA staff that enables detailed searches of published research and research projects.

If you have VA-Intranet access, click here for more information vaww.hsrd.research.va.gov/dimensions/

VA staff not currently on the VA network can access Dimensions by registering for an account using their VA email address.
   Search Dimensions for VA for this citation
* Don't have VA-internal network access or a VA email address? Try searching the free-to-the-public version of Dimensions



Abstract:

The few pharmacological treatments shown to be effective in reducing sleep disturbance in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) might work through normalization of rapid eye movement (REM). However, evidence of REM sleep disturbance in PTSD has been inconsistent and the definition of REM bout has varied as well. In this study, we compared polysomnographic findings in adults with PTSD to both normal sleepers and insomniacs. We found no differences between those with and without PTSD on REM bout frequency or duration. We did, however, find gender differences within our PTSD sample as consistent with a previous review suggesting that males with PTSD are more likely to demonstrate REM sleep disturbance. Consensus on REM bout definition is needed, in addition to studies powered to detect gender differences.





Questions about the HSR&D website? Email the Web Team.

Any health information on this website is strictly for informational purposes and is not intended as medical advice. It should not be used to diagnose or treat any condition.