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Teaching the teachers: faculty preparedness and evaluation of a retreat in screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment.

Childers JW, Broyles LM, Hanusa BH, Kraemer KL, Conigliaro J, Spagnoletti C, McNeil M, Gordon AJ. Teaching the teachers: faculty preparedness and evaluation of a retreat in screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment. Substance Abuse. 2012 Jan 1; 33(3):272-7.

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Abstract:

Effective clinical faculty are essential for disseminating substance abuse screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT). The authors developed an 8-hour SBIRT training for internal medicine faculty preceptors. Trainers conducted SBIRT lectures and small-group communication practice sessions. The authors assessed participants'' (n = 27) knowledge, skills, and attitudes using an enhanced Alcohol and Alcohol Problems Perceptions Questionnaire (AAPPQ). Participants self-assessed their changes in SBIRT competence and comfort. Faculty trainees did not feel competent in SBIRT, particularly in intervention and referral to treatment. AAPPQ subscale scores were highest in Role Legitimacy and Motivation and lowest in Role Adequacy and Satisfaction. After training, faculty members reported greater likelihood of performing and teaching SBIRT. In some topic areas, faculty attending an SBIRT training reported limited knowledge and competence for treating drinkers; however, their interest and motivation for doing so was high. Ongoing faculty and organizational development efforts may help close these gaps.





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