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Chronic kidney disease is associated with adverse outcomes among elderly patients taking clopidogrel after hospitalization for acute coronary syndrome.

Fischer MJ, Ho PM, McDermott K, Lowy E, Parikh CR. Chronic kidney disease is associated with adverse outcomes among elderly patients taking clopidogrel after hospitalization for acute coronary syndrome. BMC nephrology. 2013 May 20; 14(1):107.

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Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with worse outcomes among patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Less is known about the impact of CKD on longitudinal outcomes among clopidogrel treated patients following ACS. METHODS: Using a retrospective cohort design, we identified patients hospitalized with ACS between 10/1/2005 and 1/10/10 at Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) facilities and who were discharged on clopidogrel. Using outpatient serum creatinine values, estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR (1.73 ml/min/m2)] was calculated using the CKD-EPI equation. The association between eGFR and mortality, hospitalization for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and major bleeding were examined using Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS: Among 7413 patients hospitalized with ACS and discharged taking clopidogrel, 34.5% had eGFR 30-60 and 11.6% had eGFR? < 30. During 1-year follow-up after hospital discharge, 10% of the cohort died, 18% were hospitalized for AMI, and 4% had a major bleeding event. Compared to those with eGFR? > = 60, individuals with eGFR 30-60 (HR 1.45; 95% CI: 1.18-1.76) and? < 30 (HR 2.48; 95% CI: 1.97-3.13) had a significantly higher risk of death. A progressive increased risk of AMI hospitalization was associated with declining eGFR: HR 1.20; 95% CI: 1.04-1.37 for eGFR 30-60 and HR 1.47; 95% CI: 1.22-1.78 for eGFR? < 30. eGFR? < 30 was independently associated with over a 2-fold increased risk in major bleeding (HR 2.09; 95% CI: 1.40-3.12) compared with eGFR? > = 60. CONCLUSION: Lower levels of kidney function were associated with higher rates of death, AMI hospitalization, and major bleeding among patients taking clopidogrel after hospitalization for ACS.





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