Talk to the Veterans Crisis Line now
U.S. flag
An official website of the United States government

Health Services Research & Development

Go to the ORD website
Go to the QUERI website

HSR&D Citation Abstract

Search | Search by Center | Search by Source | Keywords in Title

Pain-related anxiety mediates the relationship between depressive symptoms and pain interference in veterans with hepatitis C.

Adams MH, Lovejoy TI, Turk DC, Dobscha SK, Hauser P, Morasco BJ. Pain-related anxiety mediates the relationship between depressive symptoms and pain interference in veterans with hepatitis C. General hospital psychiatry. 2015 Nov 1; 37(6):533-7.

Dimensions for VA is a web-based tool available to VA staff that enables detailed searches of published research and research projects.

If you have VA-Intranet access, click here for more information vaww.hsrd.research.va.gov/dimensions/

VA staff not currently on the VA network can access Dimensions by registering for an account using their VA email address.
   Search Dimensions for VA for this citation
Abstract:

OBJECTIVE: Depression and chronic pain are common in persons chronically infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV), although little is known about the rate of co-occurrence or mechanisms by which they are associated. We evaluated whether pain-related anxiety mediates the relationship between depressive symptoms and pain-related physical functioning in patients with HCV. METHODS: Patients with HCV (n = 175) completed self-report measures assessing demographic characteristics, pain-related function and mental health. Path analyses examined direct effects of cognitive-affective and somatic symptoms of depression on pain interference and indirect effects of these relationships via four subscales of the Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale-20. RESULTS: Cognitive-affective and somatic symptoms of depression were positively and significantly related to pain interference. Pain-related anxiety mediated the relationship between both cognitive-affective and somatic symptoms of depression, and this mediation was predominantly accounted for by the escape-avoidance component of pain-related anxiety. CONCLUSIONS: Findings indicate a potential mediating role of pain-related anxiety, particularly escape-avoidance anxiety, on the relationship between depression and pain interference in patients with HCV. These findings suggest that escape-avoidance anxiety may be a particularly germane target for treatment in patients with HCV and chronic pain, particularly when depression, with characteristic features of withdrawal and inhibition, is a comorbid condition.





Questions about the HSR&D website? Email the Web Team.

Any health information on this website is strictly for informational purposes and is not intended as medical advice. It should not be used to diagnose or treat any condition.