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Survey finds improvement in cognitive biases that drive overtreatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria after a successful antimicrobial stewardship intervention.

Grigoryan L, Naik AD, Horwitz D, Cadena J, Patterson JE, Zoorob R, Trautner BW. Survey finds improvement in cognitive biases that drive overtreatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria after a successful antimicrobial stewardship intervention. American journal of infection control. 2016 Dec 1; 44(12):1544-1548.

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Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Lack of guideline knowledge and cognitive biases are barriers that drive overtreatment of catheter-associated asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB). We explored whether providers' knowledge and attitudes toward management of ASB differed before and after a multifaceted guidelines implementation intervention, reported elsewhere. METHODS: We surveyed providers' knowledge of guidelines, cognitive-behavioral constructs, and self-reported familiarity with the relevant Infectious Diseases Society of America guidelines. The survey was administered to providers in the preintervention (n? = 169) and postintervention (n? = 157) periods at the intervention site and postintervention (n? = 65) at the comparison site. RESULTS: At the intervention site, the mean knowledge score increased significantly during the postintervention period (from 57.5%-69.9%; P? < .0001) and fewer providers reported following incorrect cognitive cues (pyuria and organism type) for treatment of ASB. The knowledge of guidelines was higher in the postintervention sample after adjusting for provider type in the multiple linear regression analysis. Cognitive behavioral constructs (ie, self-efficacy, behavior, social norms, and risk perceptions) and self-reported familiarity with the guidelines also significantly improved during the postintervention period. CONCLUSIONS: We identified and targeted specific barriers that drive overtreatment of ASB. Guideline implementation interventions targeting cognitive biases are essential for encouraging the application of ASB guidelines into practice.





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