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Microbial risk markers for childhood caries in pediatricians' offices.

Kanasi E, Johansson I, Lu SC, Kressin NR, Nunn ME, Kent R, Tanner AC. Microbial risk markers for childhood caries in pediatricians' offices. Journal of dental research. 2010 Apr 1; 89(4):378-83.

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Abstract:

Dental caries in pre-school children has significant public health and health disparity implications. To determine microbial risk markers for this infection, this study aimed to compare the microbiota of children with early childhood caries with that of caries-free children. Plaque samples from incisors, molars, and the tongue from 195 children attending pediatricians' offices were assayed by 74 DNA probes and by PCR to Streptococcus mutans. Caries-associated factors included visible plaque, child age, race, and snacking habits. Species were detected more frequently from tooth than tongue samples. Lactobacillus gasseri (p < 0.01), Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus vaginalis, and S. mutans with Streptococcus sobrinus (all p < 0.05) were positively associated with caries. By multifactorial analysis, the probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus was negatively associated with caries. Prevotella nigrescens was the only species (p < 0.05) significantly associated with caries by the 'false discovery' rate. Analysis of the data suggests that selected Lactobacillus species, in addition to mutans streptococci, are risk markers for early childhood caries.





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